FirewallD, or Dynamic Firewall Manager, is the replacement for the IPTables firewall in Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The main improvement over IPTables is the capacity to make cahnges without the need to restart the whole firewall service.

FirewallD was first introduced in Fedora 18 and has been the default firewall mechanism for Fedora since then. Finally this year Red Hat decided to include it in RHEL 7, and of course it also made its way to the different RHEL clones like CentOS 7 and Scientific Linux 7.

Checking FirewallD service status

To get the basic status of the service simply use firewall-cmd --state.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --state
running
[root@centos7 ~]#

If you need to get a more detailed state of the service you can always use systemctl command.

[root@centos7 ~]# systemctl status firewalld.service
firewalld.service - firewalld - dynamic firewall daemon
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/firewalld.service; enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Wed 2014-11-19 06:47:42 EST; 32min ago
 Main PID: 873 (firewalld)
   CGroup: /system.slice/firewalld.service
           └─873 /usr/bin/python -Es /usr/sbin/firewalld --nofork --nopid

Nov 19 06:47:41 centos7.vlab.local systemd[1]: Starting firewalld - dynamic firewall daemon...
Nov 19 06:47:42 centos7.vlab.local systemd[1]: Started firewalld - dynamic firewall daemon.
[root@centos7 ~]#

To enable or disable FirewallD again use systemctl commands.

systemctl enable firewalld.service
systemctl disable firewalld.service

Managing firewall zones

FirewallD introduces the zones concept, a zone is no more than a way to define the level of trust for a set of connections. A connection definition can only be part of one zone at the same time but zones can be grouped  There is a set of predefined zones:

  • Public – For use in public areas. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.
  • Drop – Any incoming network packets are dropped, there is no reply. Only outgoing network connections are possible.
  • Block – Any incoming network connections are rejected with an icmp-host-prohibited message for IPv4 and icmp6-adm-prohibited for IPv6. Only network connections initiated within this system are possible.
  • External – For use on external networks with masquerading enabled especially for routers. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.
  • DMZ – For computers DMZ network, with limited access to the internal network. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.
  • Work – For use in work areas. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.
  • Home – For use in home areas. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.
  • Trusted – All network connections are accepted.
  • Internal – For use on internal networks. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.

By default all interfaces are assigned to the public zone. Each zone is defined in its own XML file stored in /usr/lib/firewalld/zones. For example the public zone XML file looks like this.

root@centos7 zones]# cat public.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<zone>
  <short>Public</short>
  <description>For use in public areas. You do not trust the other computers on networks to not harm your computer. Only selected incoming connections are accepted.</description>
  <service name="ssh"/>
  <service name="dhcpv6-client"/>
</zone>
[root@centos7 zones]#

Retrieve a simple list of the existing zones.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --get-zones
block dmz drop external home internal public trusted work
[root@centos7 ~]#

Get a detailed list of the same zones.

firewall-cmd --list-all-zones

Get the default zone.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --get-default-zone
public
[root@centos7 ~]#

Get the active zones.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --get-active-zones
public
  interfaces: eno16777736 virbr0
[root@centos7 ~]#

Get the details of a specific zone.

[root@centos7 zones]# firewall-cmd --zone=public --list-all
public (default, active)
  interfaces: eno16777736 virbr0
  sources:
  services: dhcpv6-client ssh
  ports:
  masquerade: no
  forward-ports:
  icmp-blocks:
  rich rules:

[root@centos7 zones]#

Change the default zone.

firewall-cmd --set-default-zone=home

Interfaces and sources

Zones can be bound to a network interface and to a specific network addressing or source.

Assign an interface to a different zone, the first command assigns it temporarily and the second makes it permanently.

firewall-cmd --zone=home --change-interface=eth0
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=home --change-interface=eth0

Retrieve the zone an interface is assigned to.

[root@centos7 zones]# firewall-cmd --get-zone-of-interface=eno16777736
public
[root@centos7 zones]#

Bound the zone work to a source.

firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=work --add-source=192.168.100.0/27

List the sources assigned to a zone, in this case work.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=work --list-sources
172.16.10.0/24 192.168.100.0/27
[root@centos7 ~]#

Services

FirewallD can assign services permanently to a zone, for example to assign http service to the dmz zone. A service can be also assigned to multiple zones.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=dmz --add-service=http
success
[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --reload
success
[root@centos7 ~]#

List the services assigned to a given zone.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --list-services --zone=dmz
http ssh
[root@centos7 ~]#

Other operations

Besides of Zones, interfaces and Services management FirewallD like other firewalls can perform several network related operations like masquerading, set direct rules and manage ports.

Masquerading and port forwading

Add masquerading to a zone.

firewall-cmd --zone=external --add-masquerade

Query if masquerading is enabled in a zone.

[root@centos7 ~]# firewall-cmd --zone=external --query-masquerade
yes
[root@centos7 ~]#

You can also set port redirection. For example to forward traffic originally intended for port 80/tcp to port 8080/tcp.

firewall-cmd --zone=external --add-forward-port=port=80:proto=tcp:toport=8080

A destination address can also bee added to the above command.

firewall-cmd --zone=external --add-forward-port=port=80:proto=tcp:toport=8080:toaddr=172.16.10.21

Set direct rules

Create a firewall rule for 8080/tcp port.

firewall-cmd --direct --add-rule ipv4 filter INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW -m tcp --dport 8080 -j ACCEPT

Port management

Allow a port temporary in a zone.

firewall-cmd --zone=dmz --add-port=8080/tcp

Hopefully you found the post useful to start working with FirewallD. Comments are welcome.

Juanma.

Team+OpenStack+@+VMwareVMware Integrated OpenStack was made available for customers last Thursday. It is a exciting time to be part of VMware.

Coincidentally with this announcement I have updated my original post about VIO installation with new screenshots and information from the GA version of VIO and this post has been also published in our official VMware OpenStack Blog.

Also if you want to quickly experience VMware and OpenStack all together there is a new Hands On Lab available about VIO, the name is HOL-SDC-1420 VMware Integrated OpenStack and NSX.

Happy Stacking!

Juanma.

VMware Integrated OpenStack, or VIO, was announced during last year VMworld in San Francisco and has been finally released today by VMware.

For me this is a very special release because I have been one of the lucky internal adopters and beta testers of VIO. I have spent many hours working with several VIO builds and trying to help our incredible engineering team. This is in my opinion a really solid and well designed product and will be a game changer in the OpenStack world. Honestly I cannot be more excited :)

IMAGE01

VIO is basically a VMware supported OpenStack distribution prepared to run on top of an existing VMware infrastructure. VMware Integrated OpenStack will empower any VMware Administrator to easily deliver and operate an Enterprise production grade OpenStack cloud on VMware components. This means that you will be able at to take advantage of all VMware vSphere great features like HA, DRS or VSAN for your OpenStack cloud and also extend and integrate it with other VMware management components like vRealize Operations and vRealize Log Insight.

VIO components

VIO is made by two main building blocks, first the VIO Manager and second OpenStack components. VIO is packaged as an OVA file that contains the VIO Manager server and an Ubuntu Linux virtual machine to be used as the template for the different OpenStack components.

The OpenStack services in VIO are deployed as a distributed highly available solution formed by the following components:

  • OpenStack controllers. Two virtual machines running Horizon Dashboard, Nova (API, scheduler and VNC) services, Keystone, Heat, Glance, and Cinder services in an active-active cluster.
  • Memcached cluster.
  • RabbitMQ cluster, for messaging services used by all OpenStack services.
  • Load Balancer virtual machines, an active-active cluster managing the internal and public virtual IP addresses.
  • Nova Compute machine, running the n-cpu service.
  • Database cluster. A three node MariaDB Galera cluster that stores the OpenStack metadata.
  • Object Storage machine, running Swift services.
  • DHCP nodes. These nodes are only required if NSX is not selected as provider for Neutron.

Installation requirements

To be able to successfully deploy VIO you will need at least the following:

  • One management cluster with two to three hosts, depending on the hardware resources of the hosts.
  • One Edge cluster. As with any NSX for vSphere deployment it is recommended to deploy a separate cluster to run all Edge gateway instances.
  • One compute cluster to be used by Nova to run instances. One ESXi host will be enough but again that will depend on how much resources are available and what kind of workloads you want to run.
  • Management network with at least 15 static IP addresses available.
  • External network with a minimum of two IP addresses available. This is the network where Horizon portal will be exposed and that will be used by the tenants to access OpenStack APIs and services.
  • Data network, only needed if NSX is going to be used. The different tenant logical network will be created on top of this, the management network can be used but it is recommended to have a separate network.
  • NSX for vSphere, 6.1.2 at minimum. It has to be setup prior to VIO deployment if NSX plugin is going to be used with Neutron.
  • Distributed Port Group. In case of choosing DVS-based networking a vSphere port-group tagged with VLAN 4095 must be setup. This port group will be used as the data network.

The hardware requirements are around 56 vCPU, 192GB of memory and 605GB of storage. To that you have to add NSX for vSphere required resources for the NSX Manager, the three NSX Controllers and the NSX Edge pool, if NSX is going to be used.

Anyway in a future post I will review in detail all the pre-requisites and their setup process for VIO, and the integration between NSX-v and Neutron.

VIO Installation

Now that we have seen a bit of VIO I am going to show how to perform an installation.

Deploying VIO Manager

The first step is to deploy VIO OVA on our management cluster. From vSphere Web Client launch the Deploy OVF Template wizard and enter the URL to the VIO OVA file.

IMAGE02

Accept the EULA and proceed to configure the template. First as with any OVA template enter the name and the folder,

IMAGE03

Select the datastore and the storage format.

IMAGE04

Select the network for VIO Manager.

IMAGE05

Now we will customize the template, this includes entering the VIO Manager server networking settings, NTP, SSO lookup service URL and Syslog server.

Screen Shot 2015-01-31 at 00.32.27

Go through the next two screens, click finish and start the deployment. Once it is finished you will have a new vApp with the two virtual machines. Our next step is to register the management server with vCenter, power on the OMS vApp and when the management server is fully started logout of vSphere Web Client. Log in back to vSphere Web Client, you will notice a new icon in the Home page.

Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 02.34.35

Access the VIO plugin interface and in the Summary you should see that VIO Manager has automatically registered itself with vCenter.

IMAGE08

From this screen you can also change the VIO Manager server in case you need to re-deploy a new one. To do so select the management server in the pop-up and click OK.

Screen Shot 2015-01-31 at 17.24.49

Accept the SSL certificate to finish the procedure.

Screen Shot 2014-08-23 at 01.41.07

VIO Manager Server will now be displayed as connected in the Summary tab.

IMAGE11

Deploying OpenStack

With VIO Manager running and connected to our vCenter it is time now to deploy OpenStack. Proceed to the Getting Started tab and click Deploy OpenStack.

IMAGE12

A new wizard will be launched. In the first screen we must select the deployment type. VIO allows to deploy a new OpenStack installation or deploy from a previously saved template file.

IMAGE13

Provide the vCenter administrative credentials.

IMAGE14

Select the management cluster where we are going to deploy VIO.

IMAGE15

Next you need to configure the Management and External networks. Select the appropriate vSphere port-groups for each network and fill in the network ranges, gateway, netmask and DNS server fields.

IMAGE16

Enter the values for the load balancer configuration:

  • Public Virtual IP address
  • Public Hostname, this hostname must resolve to the Public IP address.

IMAGE17

Add a cluster to be used for Nova.

IMAGE18

Add the datastores to be used by Nova to store the different instances. If you have a VSAN datastore keep in mind that to be able to use it with Nova the images stored in Glance have to be streamOptimzed.

IMAGE19

Select the datastore to be used by Glance image service.

IMAGE20

Configure Neutron networking. For Neutron there are two different options:

  • DVS-based networking
  • NSX networking

For DVS simply select the Virtual Distributed Switch where you created the port-group for the data network with the VLAN 4095 configured.

For NSX deployment you must enter:

  • NSX Manager IP address.
  • NSX Manager administrative username.
  • NSX Manager administrative user password.
  • VDN Scope. Basically the Transport Zone in NSX-v to be used as transport layer for data traffic.
  • Edge Cluster. A vSphere cluster to deploy the NSX Edge instances.
  • Virtual Distributed Switch for NSX networking.
  • External Network. This a port group to be used as external network by instances in OpenStack via a virtual router. This port group should be accessible from compute, management and edge clusters.

IMAGE21

During the Neutron configuration the wizard will connect to the NSX Manager with the provided credentials and will ask to accept the SSL certificate.

IMAGE22

In the next screen the wizard will ask for the OpenStack admin user, password and project. Also you can select the Keystone type option:

  • Database
  • Active Directory as LDAP Server.

IMAGE23

Finally set the syslog server, it is not mandatory to set this value but it is highly recommended.

IMAGE24

Review the configuration and click Finish.

Screen Shot 2015-01-31 at 20.43.54

Review the configuration and click Finish.

The deployment will take some time, depending on your storage backend. In my testing lab took around one hour, but it is a nested environment running on NFS so you can expect much better times deploying in a real world setup. When it is finished you can review the different components of VIO with vSphere Web Client in VMs and Templates, there would be a new folder structure containing all VIO virtual machines.

IMAGE25

 Validate your VIO installation

In your favorite browser open an HTTPS session against the public hostname or virtual IP address configured during VIO installation. The Horizon portal login page will display.

Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 22.50.41

Enter the admin credentials and OpenStack admin Overview page will show up. The access the Hypervisors area and check that the selected cluster for Nova appears there.

Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 22.53.19

At this point VIO is setup and you can start to work in Horizon or using the CLI as with any other OpenStack distribution.

Have fun and happy stacking!

Juanma.

Being used to have Cockpit in my Fedora 21 Server VMs I decided that having it also on my CentOS machines would be awesome, unfortunately I quickly found that Cockpit was not available in CentOS repositories. Of course I knew that Cockpit comes installed and enabled by default in CentOS 7 Atomic host image so I figured out that those packages had to be hidden in some Atomic related repo.

After looking a bit I finally found in GitHub the sig-atomic-buildscripts repository that belongs to CentOS Project. This repository contains several scripts and files intended to build your own CentOS Atomic host including virt7-testing.repo, the Yum repository file needed for Cockpit.

Clone the GutHub repository.

git clone https://github.com/baude/sig-atomic-buildscripts

Copy virt7-testing.repo file to /etc/yum.repos.d and install Cockpit.

yum install cockpit

Enable Cockpit service.

[root@webtest ~]# systemctl enable cockpit.socket
ln -s '/usr/lib/systemd/system/cockpit.socket' '/etc/systemd/system/sockets.target.wants/cockpit.socket'
[root@webtest ~]#

Add Cockpit to the list of trusted services in FirewallD.

[root@webtest ~]# firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=cockpit
success
[root@webtest ~]#
[root@webtest ~]# firewall-cmd --reload
success
[root@webtest ~]#
[root@webtest ~]# firewall-cmd --list-services
cockpit dhcpv6-client ssh
[root@webtest ~]#

Start Cockpit socket.

systemctl start cockpit.socket

Do no try to access Cockpit yet, there is an issue about running Cockpit on stock CentOS/RHEL 7. To be able to start it we need first to modify the service file to disable SSL.Edit file /usr/lib/systemd/system/cockpit.service and modify ExecStart line to look like this.

ExecStart=/usr/libexec/cockpit-ws --no-tls

I know this procedure will invalidate Cockpit for a production environment in RHEL7 at least for now but this is for my lab environment and I can live with it.

Reload systemd.

systemctl daemon-reload

Restart Cockpit.

systemctl restart cockpit

Access Cockpit web interface, login as root and have fun :-)

Screen Shot 2015-01-09 at 01.57.51

Juanma.

 

fedora_infinity_140x140Cockpit is a new web based server manager to administer Linux server, it will provide the system administrators with a user friendly interface to manage their Linux servers, it includes multiserver managing capacity and more importantly it will create no interference or disconnection between the tasks done from the web and from the command line. This last feature is specially useful

By default Cockpit, stable version, comes installed and enabled in Fedora 21 Server. It also can be found in CentOS/RHEL 7 Atomic, Fedora 21 Atomic and Fedora 21 Cloud, and there are plans in the near future to support Arch Linux.

Lets review now some of the features of Cockpit, as said before multiple servers can be managed from the same Cockpit instance.

Screen Shot 2014-12-31 at 19.26.00

Once you access one of managed nodes it will present general overview of the server with real-time charts of CPU, Memory, Disk I/O and Network Traffic.

Screen Shot 2014-12-31 at 19.37.53

On the left pane there are a series of actionable items that will give you access to the different subsystems of the node like Networking, Storage, User Accounts and even the status of the Docker containers running on the server, if the Docker service has been enabled.

System services view.

Screen Shot 2014-12-31 at 19.52.53

When a process is selected Cockpit will display its details.

Screen Shot 2015-01-08 at 12.11.27

Networking area displays traffic for the selected interface, the journal of the networking system and even allows you to create a new bond interface, a new bridge or add a new VLAN tag to the interface.

Screen Shot 2014-12-31 at 19.53.18

The Storage view will display similar info for the disks, and will display detailed information for each of them, review the LVM configuration of the server and perform different storage related operations.

Screen Shot 2014-12-31 at 19.53.45

Journal view lets you review systemd journal. You can go back seven days into the log and filter on the type of messages.

Screen Shot 2014-12-31 at 19.54.29

After using Cockpit for some time in my lab I can say that I genuinely love it, the interface is pretty fast, it uses systemd for everything and it does not interface with my console-based admin habits, on the contrary is a great complement to them.

Juanma.

A question I’ve heard a few times, what are the command equivalencies between a standard Open vSwitch, running inside a Linux box, and the NSX vSwitch running inside ESXi? I have written this post to clarify this a bit.

There are four commands in NSX CLI that have equivalencies in the OVS world:

NVS Command OVS Command
nsx-dbctl ovs-vsctl
nsx-dpctl ovs-dpctl
nsx-appctl ovs-appctl
nsx-flowctl ovs-flowctl

nsx-dbctl

ovs-dbctl command, like its OVS equivalent ovs-vsctl, Sub-commands are the same, and for example nsx-dbctl show will produce a similar output to ovs-vsctl show.

~ # nsx-dbctl show
ec451c1a-0258-423a-b406-dec83af4b241
    Manager "ssl:192.168.110.201:6632"
        is_connected: true
    Bridge "br-vmnic1"
        fail_mode: standalone
        Port "vmk3"
            Interface "vmk3"
        Port "vmnic1"
            Interface "vmnic1"
    Bridge br-int
        Controller "ssl:192.168.110.201:6633"
            is_connected: true
        Controller "unix:ovs-l3d.mgmt"
            is_connected: true
        fail_mode: secure
        Port "vNic.3000004"
            Interface "vNic.3000004"
        Port "vNic.3000006"
            Interface "vNic.3000006"
        Port "vNic.3000005"
            Interface "vNic.3000005"
    ovs_version: "2.0.2.31704"
~ #

nsx-dpctl

nsx-dpctl command maps to ovs-dpctl and much like it allow you to manage Open vSwitch datapaths.

~ # nsx-dpctl show
system@nsx-vswitch:
        lookups: hit:1770781 missed:192476 lost:0
        flows: 14
        port 50331650: vmnic1
        port 50331651: vmk3
        port 50331652: vNic.3000004
        port 50331653: vNic.3000005
        port 50331654: vNic.3000006
~ #

nsx-appctl

nsx-appctl will allow the administrator to manage and configure OVS daemons. It maps to ovs-appctl command.

~ # nsx-appctl dpif/show
system@nsx-vswitch: hit:2230477 missed:148652
        flows: cur: 17, avg: 17, max: 33, life span: 1918447ms
        hourly avg: add rate: 66.907/min, del rate: 66.880/min
        daily avg: add rate: 43.476/min, del rate: 43.461/min
        overall avg: add rate: 60.918/min, del rate: 60.909/min
        br-int: hit:142949 missed:8461
                vNic.3000004 1/50331652: (system)
                vNic.3000005 2/50331653: (system)
                vNic.3000006 3/50331654: (system)
        br-vmnic1: hit:2087528 missed:140191
                vmk3 2/50331651: (system)
                vmnic1 1/50331650: (system)
~ #

nsx-flowctl

nsx-flowctl is the equivalent of ovs-flowctl and will allow you to manage NSX vSwich flow tables, ports, etc.

~ # nsx-flowctl show br-bond0
OFPT_FEATURES_REPLY (xid=0x3): dpid:0000725d4492c540
n_tables:254, n_buffers:256
capabilities: FLOW_STATS TABLE_STATS PORT_STATS QUEUE_STATS ARP_MATCH_IP
actions: OUTPUT SET_VLAN_VID SET_VLAN_PCP STRIP_VLAN SET_DL_SRC SET_DL_DST SET_NW_SRC SET_NW_DST SET_NW_TOS SET_TP_SRC SET_TP_DST ENQUEUE
 1(vmnic4): addr:00:50:56:01:08:c6
     config:     0
     state:      0
     current:    1GB-FD
     advertised: 10MB-HD 10MB-FD 100MB-HD 100MB-FD 1GB-HD 1GB-FD
     supported:  10MB-HD 10MB-FD 100MB-HD 100MB-FD 1GB-HD 1GB-FD
     speed: 1000 Mbps now, 1000 Mbps max
 2(vmnic5): addr:00:50:56:01:08:c8
     config:     0
     state:      0
     current:    1GB-FD
     advertised: 10MB-HD 10MB-FD 100MB-HD 100MB-FD 1GB-HD 1GB-FD
     supported:  10MB-HD 10MB-FD 100MB-HD 100MB-FD 1GB-HD 1GB-FD
     speed: 1000 Mbps now, 1000 Mbps max
 3(vmk3): addr:00:50:56:66:57:18
     config:     0
     state:      0
     speed: 0 Mbps now, 0 Mbps max
OFPT_GET_CONFIG_REPLY (xid=0x6): frags=normal miss_send_len=0
~ #

Courteous comments are welcome.

Juanma.

VMware has released a new vRealize Operations Manager management pack for NSX Multi-hypervisor. This new management pack will allow vROps to extend its management capabilities into any NSX-MH infrastructure.

This management pack provides a great set a features, including:

  • Operational visibility into the different NSX-MH components, from NSX Manager to Controllers, transport nodes and logical elements of the network.
  • Search and drill down functionality to help the administrator monitor the health of the NSX objects.
  • Alerts and root cause problem solving capabilities by detecting configuration, connectivity and health deficiencies into the NSX environment.
  • Report templates for NSX Multi-Hypervisor environment.

The management pack requires vRealize Operations Manager 6.0 and can be downloaded from VMware Solutions Exchange.

Installation

To install this management pack go to Administration in the left pane.

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 01.15.10

From there go to Solutions and on the right pane click on the plus sign to add the new management pack.

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 01.15.24

Browse for the pack installation file, click Upload and then click Next when the installation file is uploaded.

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 01.16.27

Accept the EULA and proceed to the last screen. Wait until the management pack is installed and then click Finish.

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 01.19.10

Configure the adapter instance

The first task is to create the credentials for the solution. Access Administration -> Credentials and create a new credential for the NSX-MH Adapter.It has to include the administration credentials for the NSX Controller, NSX Manager and vCenter Server.

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 02.19.17

Next access Administration -> Solutions, select the NSX-MH pack and click on the gear icon.

configure-nsx-mh

On the pop-up window enter the IP address or the FQDN for:

  • NSX Controller
  • NSX Manager
  • vCenter Server

Only the first NSX Controller is needed.

configure-nsx-mh_2

Test the connection, accept the certificates for the different components and click Save Settings. After this the adapter is configured and will start collecting data, it will take a some time until it displays data, depending on the size of the NSX environment, to have a full collection of data.

NSX-MH dashboards

Out of the box the management pack comes with three dashboards.

  • NSX-MH Main: It provides an overview of the health of the different network objects

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 01.29.26

  • NSX-MH Topology: Provides details about the topology of a selected object, how it connects in the networks and a view of the related alerts and metrics.

Screen Shot 2014-12-15 at 02.30.37

  • NSX-MH Object Path: This dashboard enables the administrator to visually depict a the path between two selected objects and verify how they are connected between each other and other objects.

Screen Shot 2014-12-16 at 01.32.14

Juanma.

 

In the series of posts about OpenStack and KVM we saw how to add a KVM node to NSX for multi-hypervisor environments as a transport node. In this post we will discuss how to perform the same procedure for an ESXi host.

NSX vSwitch installation

Before proceeding with the installation keep in mind that NSX vSwitch can run on an ESXi host simultaneously only with VMware Standard Switch, distributed switches are not supported.

Install the NSX vSwitch vib file using esxcli.

~ # esxcli software vib install --no-sig-check -v /tmp/vmware-nsxvswitch-2.1.3-35984-prod2013-stage-release.vib
Installation Result
   Message: Operation finished successfully.
   Reboot Required: false
   VIBs Installed: VMware_bootbank_vmware-nsxvswitch_2.1.3-35984
   VIBs Removed:
   VIBs Skipped:
~ #
~ # esxcli software vib list | grep nsx
vmware-nsxvswitch              2.1.3-35984                           VMware  VMwareCertified   2014-07-13
~ #

Check that the a new virtual switch has been created on the host, don’t use esxcli but the good old esxcfg-vswitch command because for now there is no namespace available in esxcli for NSX vSwitch.

~ # esxcfg-vswitch -l
Switch Name      Num Ports   Used Ports  Configured Ports  MTU     Uplinks
vSwitch0         1536        7           128               1500    vmnic0,vmnic1

  PortGroup Name        VLAN ID  Used Ports  Uplinks
  vMotion               0        1           vmnic0,vmnic1
  Management Network    0        1           vmnic0,vmnic1

Switch Name      Num Ports   Used Ports  Configured Ports  MTU     Uplinks
vSwitch1         1536        6           128               1500    vmnic2,vmnic3

  PortGroup Name        VLAN ID  Used Ports  Uplinks
  vsan                  0        1           vmnic2,vmnic3

Switch Name      Num Ports   Used Ports  Uplinks
nsx-vswitch      1536        1

~ #

NSX vSwitch configuration

With NSX vSwitch installed proceed to the conifguration. First connect an uplink to the switch, this will create an NVS bridge which is the equivalent of an OVS bridge in Open vSwitch.

nsxcli uplink/connect vmnic4

Set an IP address for the uplink, this IP address will be used later to create the transport tunneling endpoint when we connect the ESXi as a transport node to NSX. You can also specify the VLAN tag by appending vlan=<vlan_id> as an additional parameter to the command.

nsxcli uplink/set-ip vmnic4 192.168.110.123 255.255.255.0

Validate that the bridge is correctly configured. Use nsxcli port/show to verify the bridge and nsxcli uplink/show for the uplink.

~ # nsxcli port/show
br-int:
-------

br-vmnic4:
----------
vmnic4
vmk3

~ #

In the uplink/show output look for an entry like the one below.

==============================
vmnic4:
MAC       : 00:50:56:01:08:ca
Link      : Up
MTU       : 1500
IP config :
------------------------------
VMK intf  : vmk3
MAC addr  : 00:50:56:6b:ca:dd
Services  : NSX-Tunneling
VLAN      : 0
IP        : 192.168.110.123(Static)
Mask      : 255.255.255.0(Static)
..............................
------------------------------
Connection : NVS (uplink0)
Configured as standalone interface
==============================

You can also check the status of the vmkernel interface with esxcli and with nsxcli.

 ~ # esxcli network ip interface ipv4 get -i vmk3
Name  IPv4 Address     IPv4 Netmask   IPv4 Broadcast   Address Type  DHCP DNS
----  ---------------  -------------  ---------------  ------------  --------
vmk3  192.168.110.123  255.255.255.0  192.168.110.255  STATIC           false
~ #
~ # nsxcli vmknic/show vmk3
vmk3:
MAC addr  : 00:50:56:6b:ca:dd
Services  : NSX-Tunneling
VLAN      : 0
IP        : 192.168.110.123(Static)
Mask      : 255.255.255.0(Static)
Assoc with: vmnic4
..............................
~ #

The next step is configure the gateway  for NSX vSwitch.

~ # nsxcli gw/set tunneling 192.168.110.2
~ #
~ # nsxcli gw/show tunneling
Tunneling:
Configured default gateway       : 192.168.110.2
Currently active default gateway : 192.168.110.2 (Manual)
~ #

Connect NSX vSwitch instance to NSX controller cluster.

~ # nsxcli manager/set ssl:192.168.110.31
~ #
~ # nsx-dbctl show
e42912a7-693f-43ee-84d5-11b5bb3491eb
    Manager "ssl:192.168.110.31:6632"
    Bridge br-int
        fail_mode: secure
    Bridge "br-vmnic4"
        fail_mode: standalone
        Port "vmk3"
            Interface "vmk3"
        Port "vmnic4"
            Interface "vmnic4"
    ovs_version: "2.1.3.35984"
~ #

Create an opaque network. An opaque network is basically a transport bridge that will provide the network backend for the virtual machines. Opaque networks must be identified during its creation based on its type and ID.

In this particular case the ESXi will be added later to a cluster acting as nova compute backend for my OpenStack lab so the network type must be nsx.network and the UUID have to match the configured one for the integration_bridge setting in nova.conf file. We also need to specify the port attach mode, for OpenStack environments is manual.

~ # nsxcli network/add NSX-Bridge NSX-Bridge nsx.network manual
success
~ #
~ # nsxcli network/show
UUID                                        Name                    Type            Mode
----                                        ----                    ----            ----
NSX-Bridge                                  NSX-Bridge              nsx.network     manual
~ #

Add ESXi as transport node

The final part of the procedure is to add our new ESXi server as transport node to NSX. Log into NSX Manager web UI and initiate the wizard to add a new Hypervisor. First specify the name of the new hypervisor.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 02.13.30

Set the integration bridge.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 02.22.44

Select Security Certificate as credential type and paste the NSX vSwitch SSL certificate. The certificate can be retrieved from /etc/nsxvswitch/nsxvswitch-cert.pem.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 02.29.50

Add an SST transport connector, using the IP address configured for the uplink.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 02.31.57

Click Save & View and verify the new hypervisor configuration in NSX.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 02.36.15

The setup of our new ESXi server within NSX is done. As always comments are welcomed.

Juanma.

One of the pillars of my personal OpenStack ecosystem is DevStack. For those of you new to the OpenStack world DevStack is a tool, basically is a shell script, that allows to deploy a full OpenStack environment, installing every required dependency. It is widely used amongst beginners and the development community.

My DevStack instance is a Fedora 20 virtual machine with 2 vCPUs and 2GB of memory, I use it mostly for testing and development. I have setup a small vSphere environment in Fusion with a vCSA virtual machine and a nested ESXi, both 5.5 version. The DNS and NFS services are provided by my management VM which is another Fedora 20 VM with just 512MB of RAM.

My local.conf file is no rocket science as you have seen, but may be it can be of help to anyone wanting to quickly setup a DevStack+vSphere development environment.

Juanma.

 

Welcome to Part 4 for this series about OpenStack and VMware NSX. To do a quick review, in the first three parts we described the different VMware NSX components and concepts and how to install and configure them, also discussed how to install and configure the KVM and GlusterFS nodes. In this fourth part of the series we will see how to deploy OpenStack in a three-node architecture and integrate it with our existent NSX installation.

If you remember the first post where I described the components of the lab, there were three OpenStack dedicated nodes:

  • Cloud controller node
  • Neutron networking node
  • Nova compute node

Instead of installing from scratch I decided to go with one of the OpenStack distributions: RDO. What is RDO and why I decided for it? RDO is a community distribution of OpenStack sponsored by Red Hat, yes I just say Red Hat so please stop the eye rolling.

RDO is the upstream version of RHEL OpenStack Platform, the commercial version of OpenStack by Red Hat. During the last months I tried several flavors of OpenStack and while I still think that installing from scratch is the best way to learn, in fact is what I did for my first labs, RDO gives me the possibility to quickly create my testing labs. Also RHEL OP Version 4, based on RDO, is supported with VMware NSX and I really couldn’t resist myself to try it.

Installation prerequisites

Before proceeding with the installation there are some preparations we need to perform on the OpenStack nodes.

SSH key generation

Generate a new SSH key to be later distributed on the OpenStack nodes during the installation. Use ssh-keygen to generate the new key.

Neutron server preparation

In the Neutron node install NSX Open vSwitch version as described in Part 3 for the KVM nodes, the network interface configuration it’s quite similar.

With the network interface configuration files properly setup exist your SSH session and log into the VM console to create the OVS bridges like the example below.

ovs-vsctl add-br br-ex
ovs-vsctl br-set-external-id br-ex bridge-id br-ex
ovs-vsctl set Bridge br-ex fail-mode=standalone
ovs-vsctl add-port br-ex eth0

OpenStack installation

RDO relies on packstack for the installation of its different components. Packstack is a tool that will install all required software in the nodes based on an answer file. Enable RDO and EPEL repos and install openstack-packstack package.

yum install -y http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
yum install -y http://repos.fedorapeople.org/repos/openstack/openstack-havana/rdo-release-havana-8.noarch.rpm
yum install -y openstack-packstack

Once it is installed generate a new answer file, we will use this file as a template for our installation.

packstack --gen-answer-file rdo_answers.txt

Edit packstack answer file and modify the following entries, leave the rest with the default values. It is important to do not eliminate any entry or packstack execution will fail.

Deactivate services we do not want to deploy.

CONFIG_SWIFT_INSTALL=n
CONFIG_CEILOMETER_INSTALL=n
CONFIG_NAGIOS_INSTALL=n
CONFIG_CINDER_INSTALL=n

Nova settings.

CONFIG_NOVA_COMPUTE_HOSTS=192.168.82.42
CONFIG_NOVA_NETWORK_HOSTS=

And finally Neutron settings. Don’t set any L3 value since that part will be managed by NSX.

CONFIG_NEUTRON_SERVER_HOST=192.168.82.41
CONFIG_NEUTRON_DHCP_HOSTS=192.168.82.41
CONFIG_NEUTRON_METADATA_HOSTS=192.168.82.41

Launch OpenStack installation process.

packstack --answer-file rdo_answers.txt

The installation will take a while so you better grab a cup of coffee and have a look at the output while the software installs on each of the three nodes. If everything goes as expected we should see a similar message at the of the installation process.

 **** Installation completed successfully ******

Additional information:
 * Time synchronization installation was skipped. Please note that unsynchronized time on server instances might be problem for some OpenStack components.
 * File /root/keystonerc_admin has been created on OpenStack client host 192.168.82.40. To use the command line tools you need to source the file.
 * To access the OpenStack Dashboard browse to http://192.168.82.40/dashboard.
Please, find your login credentials stored in the keystonerc_admin in your home directory. 
 * Because of the kernel update the host 192.168.82.42 requires reboot. 
 * Because of the kernel update the host 192.168.82.40 requires reboot.
 * Because of the kernel update the host 192.168.82.41 requires reboot.
 * The installation log file is available at: /var/tmp/packstack/20140617-001835-On5TCi/openstack-setup.log 
 * The generated manifests are available at: /var/tmp/packstack/20140617-001835-On5TCi/manifests 
[root@cloud-controller ~]#

Reboot the three nodes as instructed and proceed to the next step.

Configure Glance to use GlusterFS

RDO packstack cannot configure Glance to use GlusterFS as its storage backend during the installation and it has to be configured afterwards. Fortunately the necessary steps are documented on RDO site.

Stop Glance services.

service openstack-glance-registry stop
service openstack-glance-api stop

Install gluster required packages on the controller node.

yum install glusterfs-fuse glusterfs

Mount GlusterFS share and set the ownership and permissions for glance user.

mount -t glusterfs gluster.vlab.local:gv0 /var/lib/glance/images
chown -R glance:glance /var/lib/glance/images

Start Glance services.

service openstack-glance-registry start
service openstack-glance-api start

With the installation finished OpenStack Horizon dashboard should be available at http://cloud_controller_fqdn/dashboard. Log in with the user admin, the password for this user can be found in the file /root/keystonerc_admin on the cloud controller node.

[root@cloud-controller ~]# cat keystonerc_admin
export OS_USERNAME=admin
export OS_TENANT_NAME=admin
export OS_PASSWORD=cd0ed5b5f251450f
export OS_AUTH_URL=http://192.168.82.40:35357/v2.0/
export PS1='[\u@\h \W(keystone_admin)]\$ '
[root@cloud-controller ~]#

If login fails with an unexpected error check that firewall is deactivated in all three nodes and that all services are up and running, in some of my deployments Neutron server did not start after a reboot and I had to start it manually.

Once logged into horizon navigate to Admin -> Hypervisor and check that the KVM hypervisor is properly registered.

Screen Shot 2014-06-17 at 01.56.04

Configure the NSX integration

At this point we have a working OpenStack installation with Neutron using the Open vSwitch plugin, now we will proceed to integrate our shiny OpenStack cloud with NSX.

Install NSX Neutron plugin

VMware provides a set of RPM packages containing the NSX plugin and a VMware sanctioned version of Neutron, however I found that this packages were older than my Havana installation and didn’t want to brake any dependencies and spend hours trying to fix my installation.

A tar file containing all the source for both the plugin and Neutron itself is also available and instructions on how to compile and install it are provided in NSX documentation, during my first trials I took this path but this time I decided to use the upstream plugin instead since it was available in RDO repositories.

yum install openstack-neutron-nicira

Configure NSX plugin

Register the Neutron server as a transport node on the NSX Controller Cluster.

ovs-vsctl set-manager ssl:192.168.82.45

Stop neutron services.

service neutron-server stop

Edit /etc/neutron/neutron.conf file and set core_plugin value to neutron.plugins.nicira.NeutronPlugin.NvpPluginV2.

Configure nvp.ini file accordingly, this file can be found in /etc/neutron/plugins/nicira.

Set NSX admin user and password.

nvp_user = admin
nvp_password = admin

Configure NSX controllers IP addresses.

nvp_controllers = 192.168.82.45

Set the default Transport Zone UUID and the L3 and L2 gateway serveices UUID, these values can be retrieved from the NSX Manager web.

default_tz_uuid = b948fd35-5737-4a30-8741-43134771d40c
default_l3_gw_service_uuid = adee048c-3776-4bd2-ade1-42ab5c90bf9e

Configure metadata for Nova instances, set metadata_dhcp_host_route to False in [DEFAULT] section. In [nvp] section set the metadata mode as access_network.

enable_metadata_access_network = True
metadata_mode = access_network

Create a [database] section and configure the connection to Neutron MySQL database, the data can be found on neutron.conf file.

[database]
connection = mysql://neutron:ac2191a8661b4b66@192.168.82.40/ovs_neutron

FInally before start Neutron services check nvp.ini with the command neutron-check-nvp-config. You should get something like this.

[root@neutron ~]# neutron-check-nvp-config /etc/neutron/plugins/nicira/nvp.ini
----------------------- Database Options -----------------------
        connection: mysql://neutron:ac2191a8661b4b66@192.168.82.40/ovs_neutron
        retry_interval: 10
        max_retries: 10
-----------------------    NVP Options   -----------------------
        NVP Generation Timeout -1
        Number of concurrent connections to each controller 10
        max_lp_per_bridged_ls: 5000
        max_lp_per_overlay_ls: 256
-----------------------  Cluster Options -----------------------
        requested_timeout: 30
        retries: 2
        redirects: 2
        http_timeout: 10
Number of controllers found: 1
        Controller endpoint: 192.168.82.45:443
                Gateway(L3GatewayServiceConfig) uuid: adee048c-3776-4bd2-ade1-42ab5c90bf9e
        Transport zones: [u'b948fd35-5737-4a30-8741-43134771d40c']
Done.
[root@neutron ~]#

Start Neutron services

service neutron-server start

Create a network neutron command line to test that everything is working as expected.

[root@cloud-controller ~(keystone_admin)]# neutron net-create nsx-test-net
Created a new network:
+-----------------------+--------------------------------------+
| Field                 | Value                                |
+-----------------------+--------------------------------------+
| admin_state_up        | True                                 |
| id                    | 24f3b23f-a938-40e7-b026-14c8fb77ff34 |
| name                  | nsx-test-net                         |
| port_security_enabled | True                                 |
| shared                | False                                |
| status                | ACTIVE                               |
| subnets               |                                      |
| tenant_id             | 4d9fbabd4c9d4fa4a2185ff7559ae4e8     |
+-----------------------+--------------------------------------+
[root@cloud-controller ~(keystone_admin)]#
[root@cloud-controller ~(keystone_admin)]# neutron net-list
+--------------------------------------+--------------+---------+
| id                                   | name         | subnets |
+--------------------------------------+--------------+---------+
| 24f3b23f-a938-40e7-b026-14c8fb77ff34 | nsx-test-net |         |
+--------------------------------------+--------------+---------+
[root@cloud-controller ~(keystone_admin)]#

Access NSX Manager web interface, navigate to Logical Switches and confirm that a new logical switch with the same name and UUID as the new OpenStack network has been created.

Screen Shot 2014-06-21 at 22.15.20

Congratulations! We have successfully deployed a distributed installation of OpenStack with KVM as the underlying hypervisor and integrated with VMware NSX state of the art network virtualization software. In future posts out of this four article series we will discuss some tips and other parts of OpenStack and NSX. Courteous comments are welcome.

Juanma.